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Moving into a New Home? Better Consider a Deep-Cleaning

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For the fifth month in a row, even though the pandemic, October witnessed the rate of home sales across the USA keep rising. The pandemic doesn’t seem to be slowing down the real estate market, and it is expected to continue to grow into 2021.

Having your new home deep-cleaned before moving in is always a good idea under normal circumstances. However, our current environment makes the case for a deep-clean far more appealing. Trying to deep-clean a new home by yourself can take days, not to mention arranging a time to clean before a closing day can be nearly impossible.

The reality is that buying a home is something that should be met with pleasure and delight. Truthfully, though you do not know who lived here previously or, the level of acceptable cleaning standards the previous owners may have held. Further, the law does not state that if you had COVID-19, you must disclose that in a sale. It is always better to err on the side of caution, especially for families with young children.

What Do You Need to Clean?

While you can hire a company to clean your entire new home, many choose to do much of the preliminary work themselves. So what do you clean? The easiest and most logical place to start would be high-contact areas. If you just moved in, you will be turning on lights, opening doors, turning the stove on and off, opening the refrigerator, and touching a lot of doorknobs. All of these make for good starting points.

Carpets and Rugs

If your new home has a lot of carpets, it is a strong recommendation that you have them professionally cleaned. According to the American Lung Association, your carpets may trap toxins such as mold spores, pesticides, cockroach allergens, pet dander, and toxic gases. Even if you vacuum and scrub your carpet frequently, you might not be doing a deep-enough clean to remove harmful pollutants.

Several studies have shown that rugs and carpets are notorious for trapping and releasing indoor pollution and reducing overall air quality. Children are generally more exposed to these contaminants as they have a tendency to play on the floor and not worry about toxins.

Bathrooms

One of the most notoriously contaminated areas of any home, time and time again studies show particles of urine and fecal matter can spray up to six feet. A deep clean will sanitize every area of your bathrooms, including the floor, sink, under baseboards, in crevices, behind the toilets, tiles, bathtub, shower, countertops, backsplashes, and even the shelf and cupboards.

Kitchens

As the cooking, cleaning, and feeding area of your home, there are several ways for dirt and grime to way into places that they shouldn’t. If the kitchen does not have a proper exhaust fan, there is a good chance that many unreachable surfaces such as above cupboards, crown mold, baseboards, and cupboards will have a film of grime. A deep clean would include sanitizing all sinks, appliances, cupboards, backsplash, floors, light fixtures, and countertops. This also includes pulling out the appliances and sanitizing underneath and behind them.

Basements

If the basement is unfinished, you may have more work on your hands than usual. What you want to do is start at the top and work your way down. With a broom, you can sweep away any lingering cobwebs, ensuring that you get all of the fixtures and the corners as well. Often, corner ceilings in basements could have low light, unable to see the copious cobwebs that are usually hiding. Depending on what you are using the space for, make sure that you give it a good vacuum.

If you have recently purchased a home, we can easily clean and sanitize your home in no time, just drop us a line.